How to get your music in video games

How to get your music in video games becomes more important all the time as games continue to overtake film and TV as the biggest entertainment venue. It provides one of the best ways to sell your music and get it out to listeners. Find some help to do so below.

The Binding of Isaac. Isaac has won awards for its original heavy-metal instrumental soundtrack.

Presuming you’ve already got solid recordings of great music, you want to get these tracks into the empty hands which need them most.

If you’re a hardcore gamer, yourself, you might know of some game projects in the works which might match the music you’ve made. Game devs can be very approachable, though they’re all extremely busy.

Go ahead and send your music to them directly, but be humble, friendly, professional, and brief. To them, time is worth more than gold. Make your email subject “Music for X-Project” where ‘x-project’ should be the title of their game.

Eric Versluis for DiscMakers.com suggests the following template: ““Hey, I know you’re slammed, but I’m a big fan of XYZ game and know that you have a new one coming out in six months. I would love for you to take this new song into consideration. I think it would be perfect for the game.”

Super Mario Bros. has the best-known music in video game history

If you aren’t a big gamer, you can join one of a few websites where game developers work together to get resources for their projects.

Catering specifically to musicians and game devs, IndieGameMusic.com is currently free to join and works to bring your sounds to the independent producers of video games all over the world.

Painting with a broader stroke is LikeMindedd.com, where artists of all sorts congregate to put their talents to work or to find talents with which to work.

These sites and others can find ears for your music in the video game world. Use them.

But how should you prepare your tracks before you send them out?

Music on video games
Getting Music on video games

We presumed earlier your fantastic track has a solid recording. To be clear, that means mixed, produced and mastered.

Tag the song with metadata. That’s the information that your media player shows you when you play a track: track title, artist name, album name (?), your contact information, who owns the master and publishing information. Don’t make anyone track that data down. Editing the metadata isn’t hard, but see next week for a how-to on that, too.

To send your music, don’t attach files to email, don’t use WeTransfer, and don’t use DropBox. Each can end up problematic. Box.com isn’t bad, and Soundcloud can work, too. You want to allow streaming and downloads without links which can expire over time.

Link to a maximum of three songs and include an instrumental version of each.